Drone Airspace

Many new recreational drone pilots wonder if there is specific drone airspace that they are required to fly in. The answer is no but of course with anything related to aircrafts, the answer isn’t so simple. The FAA has defined airspace for aviation and drone pilots must still follow those airspace restrictions. The good news is that these airspace restrictions are clear and the FAA even partnered with Kittyhawk to create an app. B4UFLY is the app created from the partnership and is a great resource to show drone airspace restrictions.

No Drone pilot should even worry about CLass A airspace as you’ll never be high enough to fly in it. It starts at 18,000 ft above sea level.

Class B airspace is up to 10,000 ft above ground level and is shaped like an upside down wedding cake. This airspace is around the busiest airports in the country. You may be thinking there is no way I’d be allowed to fly in this airspace but you actually can. You will need to get authorization from the FAA from the LAANC or Dronezone systems

Class C airspace typically goes up to 4,000 ft above ground level around airports with operational control towers or radar control and high aircraft traffic. Again drone pilots can fly in class C airspace as long as they have authorization from the FAA.

Class D airspace typically goes up to 2,500 ft above ground level around airports with operational control towers. Again drone pilots can fly in class D airspace as long as they have authorization from the FAA.

Class E airspace is controlled by ATC and can start at varying altitudes whether it is 1,200 ft or 700ft. Typically drone pilots will not have to worry about interacting with class E airspace.

Class G airspace is essentially the wild wild west of aviation. Yes aircraft still have to abide by FAA regulations but there is no ATC. For drone pilots we could also think of this as drone airspace as it is where we can fly with no prior FAA authorization.